Photos

These photos of the Energy Efficient Demonstration Home give you an idea of what the home looks like.

However, it is worth noting that as these photos are not taken by a professional photographer, they do not fully capture what the home looks and feels like. If you are in the area it is well worth an actual visit!

We will get some professional photos added to this page in the not too distant future.

View from the street of the Energy Efficient Demonstration Home.
Note the cladding from Weathertex (made from 97% natural timber and 3% natural wax); light colours to reduce heat in summer; permeable surfaces (grass driveway, green roof, gardens) to reduce flooding and the urban heat island effect; Australian ‘spotted gum’ timber fencing; and Climate Wise and edible plantings in the front yard and naturestrip.
View of the north face of the Energy Efficient Demonstration Home.
Note the large windows that capture the warm winter sun; the wide eave overhang for shading out the hot summer sun; and the Australian ‘spotted gum’ timber decking.
View from outside of the Energy Efficient Demonstration Home looking to the living room (June).
Note the double-glazed thermally broken aluminium windows; and the thermal mass concrete floor, which soaks up the warm winter sun to help heat the inside of the home and helps keep the home cool in summer when it is shaded by the large eave outside.
View of the inside of the Energy Efficient Demonstration Home from the living room (June).
Note the burnished concrete floor with a natural linseed sealant from Livos, which soaks up the warm winter sun; the blackbutt timber floating floor from Choices Flooring Mitchell in the kitchen and hallway where thermal mass is not needed to soak up the heat from the sun; and the large cavity sliding door that separates the hallway from the living space to allow the home to be zoned for more efficient heating and cooling.
View of the inside of the Energy Efficient Demonstration Home from the dining room (June).
Note the natural north light streaming in; and the use of pendant lights instead of downlights, which reduces the holes, air movement and full insulation coverage in the ceiling; and the cavity sliding door between the living spaces and media room, which allows the spaces to be zoned for more efficient heating and cooling.
View of the inside of the Energy Efficient Demonstration Home from the hallway (June).
Note the natural north light streaming in; the use of concrete as thermal mass where the majority of sun strikes the floor and the use of a floating timber floor in the hallway where much of the sun doesn’t hit; and the connection to the outside, where the outside decking is the same level as the concrete floor and the windows are set down between them.
View of the Energy Efficient Demonstration Home kitchen (June).
Note the big box retail kitchen, which reduced costs to enable more funds to be available for energy efficiency features and uses a recycled PET plastic and waste timber in the chipboard of the cupboard doors.
View of the Energy Efficient Demonstration Home island bench.
Note the recycled blackbutt timber benchtop from Thors Hammer; and the leftover Weathertex cladding on the front of the bench.
View of the Energy Efficient Demonstration Home study desk.
Note the Paperock board, which is layers of paper from renewable sources bonded with phenolic resin and heat/pressure cured on the top and bottom of plywood.
View of the Energy Efficient Demonstration Home master bedroom (June).
Note the reverse brick veneer wall (brick on the inside with the timber stud frame and insulation then cladding on the outside), which is another approach to getting thermal mass in a room besides a concrete floor, to soak up the warm sunshine during winter and cool the space in summer when the thermal mass is shaded.
View of the Energy Efficient Demonstration Home solar panel inverter and batteries.
Note the 5kW inverter capturing power from the 6.6kW solar panels on the roof and the two 5.8kW batteries provided by Mondiaux Solar, and the Reposit box that provides real-time monitoring for the system onto a mobile phone app.
View of the Energy Efficient Demonstration Home green roof studio.
Note the native grasses and plants; and the part sloped and part flat roofs, which give different views to the garden and will test the differences in water retention.
Views of the Energy Efficient Demonstration Home under construction – insulation and sealing.
Note in image 1 the wires and pipes in the kitchen wall; and in image 2 the insulation that covers the wires and pipes in the kitchen wall. Image 3 shows the gap left in the wall wrap from the air-conditioning pipes; and in image 4 the air-conditioning pipes gap is sealed. Image 5 shows the insulated kitchen wall with good insulation around the exhaust duct. Image 5 shows a typical bedroom with insulation well installed with no gaps
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